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*31

Last but not least, yet another scene from Hugo Santiago's Invasión (Invasion, 1969, tag).

Silva (Roberto Villanueva), at this point drunk and about to be tortured, hums and says a few verses from Jorge Luis Borges' Milonga de Manuel Flores, which he plays in this previous scene.

Photography by Ricardo Aronovich.

Y sin embargo me cuesta
Decirle adiós a la vida,
Esa cosa tan de siempre,
Tan dulce y tan conocida.

Mañana vendrá la bala
Y con la bala el olvido;
Lo dijo el sabio Merlín:
Morir es haber nacido.

¡Cuántas cosas estos ojos
En su camino habrán visto!
Quién sabe lo que verán
Después que me juzgue Cristo.

Miro en el alba mi mano,
Miro en la mano las venas;
Con extrañeza las miro
Como si fueran ajenas.

In English:

And yet it pains me
To bid farewell to life,
This thing one gets so used to,
So sweet, and so familiar.

Tomorrow the bullet’s coming
And with the bullet, oblivion;
So said Merlin the sage:
To die is to have been born.

How many things on their way
These eyes of mine have seen!
Who knows what they will see
After Christ has judged me.

At dawn I see my hand,
I see my veins in my hand;
I look at them oddly
As if they were someone else’s.

*9

Almost forgot about this one, this is a simple, cool shot from Hugo Santiago's Invasión (Invasion, 1969, tag).

Herrera (Lautaro Murúa) arrives at the stadium where he will be murdered.

Photography by Ricardo Aronovich.

*2

In this other scene from Hugo Santiago's Invasión (Invasion, 1969), perhaps not as subtle as the one I just posted, Resistance fighter Herrera (Lautaro Murúa) is literally beaten to death by the invaders.

Shot in Buenos Aires, at the Boca Juniors' stadium, La Bombonera.

Photography by Ricardo Aronovich.

Again, mind that this film precedes and oddly enough predicts some of the aspects of the Argentinian Guerra Sucia (dirty war), a period of state terrorism that lasted from 1976 to 1983.

Well, let’s go!
What’s wrong, do you want to play martyr?

*3

In this subtle scene from Hugo Santiago's Invasión (Invasion, 1969), Resistance fighter Herrera (Lautaro Murúa) is overpowered by a group of invaders, and lays his weapon.

Shot in Buenos Aires, at the Boca Juniors' stadium, La Bombonera.

Photography by Ricardo Aronovich.

*8

This is a short musical scene from Hugo Santiago's Invasión (Invasion, 1969), co-written by Jorge Luis Borges, which has been through this blog before, as the mellow Milonga de Manuel Flores.

I might post a few more since this is a relatively obscure flick, although considered by some the best Argentinian film ever made.

Music here by tango musician Aníbal Troilo, although concrete music composer Edgardo Canton also collaborated in the making of the soundtrack.

*41

This is likely the most beautiful thing I’ve seen this month, an odd find of my father’s.

Milonga de Manuel Flores, said by Roberto Villanueva, written by Jorge Luis Borges and composed by Aníbal Troilo specifically for Ubaldo de Lío's guitar, from Argentinian film Invasión (Invasion, 1969), directed by Hugo Santiago and with screenplay also by Borges.

If you press the right button, there are subtitles in both English and French, but below is Borges’ poem in its language.

Para los otros la fiebre,
Y el sudor de la agonía;
Y para mí cuatro balas,
Cuando esté clareando el día.

Manuel Flores va a morir,
Eso es moneda corriente;
Morir es una costumbre
Que sabe tener la gente.

Mañana vendrá la bala
Y con la bala el olvido;
Lo dijo el sabio Merlin:
Morir es haber nacido.

Y sin embargo me cuesta
Decirle adiós a la vida,
Esa cosa tan de siempre,
Tan dulce y tan conocida.

Miro en el alba mi mano,
Miro en la mano las venas;
Con extrañeza las miro
Como si fueran ajenas.

¡Cuántas cosas estos ojos
En su camino habrán visto!
Quién sabe lo que verán
Después que me juzgue Cristo.

Para los otros la fiebre,
Y el sudor de la agonía;
Y para mí, cuatro balas
Cuando esté clareando el día.